Got Milk!

Harvey Milk: His Lives And Death by Lillian Faderman. (2018) Yale University Press is a concise, well-written biography. A more satisfying work than either the Randy Shilts book or the Gus Van Sant feature film.

gotmilk!

Faderman’s book chronologically follows each phase of Milk’s life beginning with his childhood in an upper middle-class Jewish family on Long Island.

Intergenerational differences and conflict are there at the very start and remain as unresolved elements throughout his life.

Milk’s realization that he wasn’t quite like other boys and young men was a factor he dealt with in numerous ways. Homosexuality was almost universally condemned when he first realized he was gay. It was one of several important aspects that defined who he was and how he related to the world around him.

He tried various approaches in pursuit of a career he hoped would bring an overall sense of purpose in his life before settling on the one that was most challenging, satisfying numerous parts of himself, and leading eventually to his tragic death.

Harvey Milk is Lillian Faderman at her best and a valuable resource of LGBT history alongside her previous hefty publication, The Gay Revolution (2015) Simon And Schuster.

copyright © 2018 by N. A. Diaman, all rights reserved

http://www.nikosdiaman.com

 

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Summer Romance

Call Me By Your Name directed by Luca Guadagnino (USA) 2017 begins with the arrival of a summer intern in Northern Italy in 1983.

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Each year a Greco-Roman culture professor invites a grad student to help him with his research. This year it’s a tall, striking grad student named Oliver, who immediately captures the attention of the professor’s teenage son, Timothée.

Much of the film, and the novel by André Aciman it’s based on, is about the prolonged longing and unfulfilled physical contact of the two young men.

I put aside the book after reading perhaps the first third but the film held my interest from beginning to end.

Call Me By Your Name is now playing at The Landmark, Los Angeles and Paris Theatre, New York.

It opens 15 December 2017 at Century Centre Cinema, Chicago; Embarcadero Center Cinema and Kabuki 8, San Francisco; and E Street Cinema, Washington.

Also 22 December 2017 at Violet Crown Cinema, Austin; Shattuck 10, Berkeley; Houston 8, Houston; Hillcrest Cinema Five, San Diego; Monica Film Cener, Santa Monica; and Camelview At Fashion Square, Scottsdale;

copyright © 2017 by N. A. Diaman, all rights reserved

http://www.nikosdiaman.com

Family Portrait

The Guys Next Door directed by Amy Geller and Allie Humenuk (USA) 2016 is a documentary about an unusual relationship.

familyportrait

While it’s increasingly common for two women and even two men to bring children into the world and raise them in loving same-sex households, the male couple in this situation is assisted by a surrogate mother who also serves as the bridge between two households, one straight and the other gay.

A married woman with three children of her own volunteers to give birth to another two for her gay best friend and his Italian partner. This marvelous film covers three years before, during, and after the second child is born.

It will screen one-time only on Sunday 6 August 2017 at the New Parkway in Oakland during the upcoming San Francisco Jewish Film Festival 37.

Contact Jewish Film Institute for more information and tickets.

copyright © 2017 by N. A. Diaman, all rights reserved

www.nikosdiaman.com